What are the risks of buying illegal drugs on the street, online?

Dr. Emily Kauffman is an emergency physician at Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. Dr. Krisanna Deppen is director of the OhioHealth Grant Addiction Medicine Fellowship program. Brian Pierson is Vice President of Community Health and Wellness at Mount Carmel Health System. Dr. Erin McKnight is Vice President of the Drug Assisted Treatment Program for Addictions at National Children’s Hospital.

As healthcare professionals – and as parents and residents – we are extremely concerned about the fentanyl we see in the illicit drug supply.

Someone who buys what they think is cocaine, Adderall, Oxycontin, Percocet or another hallucinogen or stimulant – even some vape pens – online or on the street should assume it contains fentanyl or another toxic substance to “increase his power”.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid.

How to participate : Dispatch presents Columbus Conversations: “What is the state of the opioid crisis in our community?” 6 p.m. Wednesday

It can be 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine, and is undetectable by sight, smell and taste. As little as 2 milligrams of fentanyl, the equivalent of a few grains of sand, can kill a person.

After:Addicts can test fentanyl

Nearly 90% of overdose deaths in Franklin County involve fentanyl. If you use street drugs or buy pills online, carry test strips that can detect the presence of fentanyl (see attached story for where to get them).

Dr. Emily Kauffman is an emergency physician at Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. Dr. Krisanna Deppen is director of the OhioHealth Grant Addiction Medicine Fellowship program. Brian Pierson is Vice President of Community Health and Wellness at Mount Carmel Health System. Dr. Erin McKnight is Vice President of the Drug Assisted Treatment Program for Addictions at National Children’s Hospital. They will participate in Dispatch presents Columbus Conversations: “What is the state of the opioid crisis in our community?” 6 p.m. Wednesday, August 31 at The Fawcett Center Conference Theater at The Ohio State University, 2400 Olentangy River Road.

Although opioids have been getting a lot of attention lately, a new report reveals there's still a lot of work to be done to end the country's addiction problems. [KEITH SRAKOCIC/ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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