Ohio News – GPAOH http://gpaoh.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:35:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gpaoh.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Ohio News – GPAOH http://gpaoh.com/ 32 32 Man arrested, charged with tying up woman and beating her in Ohio https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/22/man-arrested-charged-with-tying-up-woman-and-beating-her-in-ohio/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:06:32 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/22/man-arrested-charged-with-tying-up-woman-and-beating-her-in-ohio/ MESOPOTAMIA, Ohio (WKBN) — A Middlefield man is being held in Trumbull County Jail for tying a woman to a ceiling last week in Mesopotamia and beating her with a belt and a garden hose. Nathan Haynes, 48, is in jail in lieu of $50,000 bond after he was arraigned in Newton Falls City Court […]]]>

MESOPOTAMIA, Ohio (WKBN) — A Middlefield man is being held in Trumbull County Jail for tying a woman to a ceiling last week in Mesopotamia and beating her with a belt and a garden hose.

Nathan Haynes, 48, is in jail in lieu of $50,000 bond after he was arraigned in Newton Falls City Court on Tuesday on charges of kidnapping and domestic violence.

Haynes was arrested after deputies from the Trumbull County Sheriff’s Office were called around 8:30 p.m. Friday to a home on the 8900 block of State Route 534 in Mesopotamia.

Reportedly, a woman said her sister was held against her will and beaten earlier in the week by Haynes. Reports say the victim said she was “punished” by Haynes on June 15 because she wanted to leave her home.

Deputies had attended Haynes’ home earlier on Friday in the 8000 block of State Road 534 but could not take any action because the victim did not tell deputies of his injuries, according to reports.

The victim told deputies at her sister’s home that Haynes tied her to the ceiling and hit her in the back 20 times with a belt and 10 times in the leg with a garden hose. Deputies took photos of his injuries and reports said there were ‘very noticeable bruises’ on his legs and back

The victim said she was tied up for half an hour and was unable to leave after being untied until Haynes left the house.

Haynes stopped in the car while deputies questioned the victim and her sister. Reports say he told police the injuries were from rough sex and the victim asked for it.

Haynes was arrested at the scene, according to reports.

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Another Hot Week on Deck: Northeast Ohio Weather Forecast https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/20/another-hot-week-on-deck-northeast-ohio-weather-forecast/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 23:19:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/20/another-hot-week-on-deck-northeast-ohio-weather-forecast/ CLEVELAND, Ohio – Brace yourself, in northeast Ohio the scorching heat is quickly returning. Temperatures are expected to climb into the 90s in Cleveland and Akron and won’t cool much, even with midweek storms, according to forecasts from the National Weather Service. Cleveland should expect plenty of sunshine on Tuesday, with highs of 91 degrees […]]]>

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Brace yourself, in northeast Ohio the scorching heat is quickly returning.

Temperatures are expected to climb into the 90s in Cleveland and Akron and won’t cool much, even with midweek storms, according to forecasts from the National Weather Service.

Cleveland should expect plenty of sunshine on Tuesday, with highs of 91 degrees and lows of 77. Akron will be two degrees warmer during the day with lows of 73 overnight.

Wednesday will start just as warm with highs of 88 degrees in Cleveland and 93 in Akron before a chance of showers and sudden thunderstorms starting around 2 p.m. and lingering until 8 p.m. Skies are expected to be clear overnight, with temperatures falling in the middle. 60s.

Temperatures will dip slightly into the 80s on Thursday with sunny and mostly clear skies. Cleveland will hit 80 degrees with a low of 64, while Akron will hit 84 degrees and drop to 59 overnight.

Similar conditions are expected on Friday, ahead of a hot weekend. Temperatures will begin to rise again in Cleveland, for a high of 85 degrees and a low of 68. Akron is expected to hit 90 degrees again on Friday, with a low of 65.

The weekend is forecast to be mostly sunny and warm, with highs rising into the 90s and possible rain showers.

Tuesday sunrise: 5:53

Sunset: 9:04 p.m.

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Don’t Let ‘Cloudy Ohio’ Make You Sad | News, Sports, Jobs https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/19/dont-let-cloudy-ohio-make-you-sad-news-sports-jobs/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 05:27:52 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/19/dont-let-cloudy-ohio-make-you-sad-news-sports-jobs/ As I write this, bright rays of sunlight are howling through my editorial office window and bouncing off my computer screen, nearly blinding me. It’s on days like this that I realize I really shouldn’t have left my sunglasses in the car. The irony, however, is that the subject of this week’s column […]]]>

As I write this, bright rays of sunlight are howling through my editorial office window and bouncing off my computer screen, nearly blinding me. It’s on days like this that I realize I really shouldn’t have left my sunglasses in the car.

The irony, however, is that the subject of this week’s column is a recent report of cloudiness in our region.

According to a press release I recently received from an outdoor motorsports company, Polaris has partnered with The Weather Channel television network on a promotional idea that was meant to get people outdoors.

Good idea, I admit – but on a day like today, it probably wouldn’t take long – especially in usually cloudy northeast Ohio.

According to the study, The Weather Channel – identified in the press release as “authority in the collection and reporting of meteorological data” — Youngstown is one of the 10 cloudiest cities in the country.

Shocking, I know!

Others making the gray list include Pittsburgh; Fort Wayne, Indiana; Washington D.C.; and Chicago. Don’t look now, but it sure looks like we’re surrounded by cloudiness.

According to the study, clouds also frequently hover over Detroit; Syracuse, New York; Seattle; Louisville, Kentucky; and Newark, NJ

That’s the bad news.

Now here’s the good news. Studies indicate that it only takes 10 minutes outdoors to improve your mood.

And sunlight especially improves your mood.

Researchers have found more mental distress in people during seasons with little sun exposure. Very sunny days are generally associated with better mental health.

Hooray for the sun!

Earlier this year, during my annual physical over the winter months, my doctor asked me a series of routine questions. Among them, she asked me if I sometimes felt depressed.

Oh good?

“Of course, I feel depressed. It’s January in northeast Ohio,” I answered. I wonder what other answer she was expecting.

The doc laughed, then went on to tell me about the benefits of using “SAD” lamps during the winter months and when the weather is, well, cloudy. No, it’s not called a “sad” lamp for obvious reasons. Rather, these special lights help ward off SAD, or Seasonal Affective Disorder, which can include forms of depression and anxiety. She told me that when we’re stuck in cloudy conditions, as we often are here in Ohio, light therapy lamps can be a good investment to provide a temporary alternative to the sun and help lift our spirits.

This is because SAD lamps produce light that mimics the sun and helps your body produce the hormone serotonin, which has been linked to improved mood and helps you feel calm and focused.

And in our cloudy little corner of the world, most of us know all about the need for sunshine.

Yes, the sun and its ultraviolet rays have negative effects, but we should also not forget the important benefits of the sun, including those that go beyond our mental health.

Medical experts point to some tangible benefits of the sun like these:

• Vitamin D: The sun is nature’s best source of vitamin D, and it takes less than 15 minutes of sun exposure a few times a week to notice a difference. Vitamin D, of course, helps strengthen bones and teeth. Low vitamin D has been linked to diseases such as osteoporosis and rickets.

• Having trouble sleeping? Serotonin from sunlight helps you get more restful sleep at night. Working in tandem with serotonin is melatonin, a chemical in your brain that lulls you to sleep and which the sun also helps your body produce.

• Blood pressure: Sunlight also triggers the release of nitric oxide in the blood, which can help lower blood pressure and improve heart health.

Of course, a sunscreen with a high SPF is a must if you’re going to be outside for any length of time. But when you get the chance here in cloudy Ohio, I urge you not to miss the opportunity to soak up the sun.

Guess it’s time for me to stop squinting at my computer screen and go soak up the sun while I get the chance!



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Christian Bentancur of Marian Central lands offers from Ohio State, Florida – Shaw Local https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/16/christian-bentancur-of-marian-central-lands-offers-from-ohio-state-florida-shaw-local/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:33:04 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/16/christian-bentancur-of-marian-central-lands-offers-from-ohio-state-florida-shaw-local/ Christian Bentancur recalls watching college football games a few years ago, thinking about what it would be like to be recruited by the top schools in NCAA Division I. And now Bentancur, who will be a junior receiver at Marian Central, finds out. The list of Bentancur schools that extended offers reached 28 on Wednesday […]]]>

Christian Bentancur recalls watching college football games a few years ago, thinking about what it would be like to be recruited by the top schools in NCAA Division I.

And now Bentancur, who will be a junior receiver at Marian Central, finds out.

The list of Bentancur schools that extended offers reached 28 on Wednesday with two other major programs, Ohio State and Florida, jumping. Some others who recently offered were Oregon, Michigan and Oklahoma.

“It’s crazy. As a kid you watch them on TV and you’re like, ‘I wonder what these people are going through’ and then you start going through it and it’s absolutely crazy,” said Bentancur “Each (offer) I am super blessed for and excited to continue this recruiting process.”

Bentancur caught 89 passes in two seasons (one shortened by COVID-19) for 1,792 yards and 24 touchdowns. He is a two-time first-team receiver for the Northwest Herald All-Area.

At 6-foot-4 and 235 pounds, Bentancur projects himself as a tight end in college. He recently visited Ohio State and Clemson, where he trained at camps. Ohio State coach Ryan Day made the offer to Bentancur on Wednesday. Florida coaching staff Billy Napier also volunteered that day.

“Usually on the phone it’s 15-20 minute conversations,” Bentancur said. “Most of the places I know quite well so there are no introductions, we just talk about what they think of me and what they offer me and we talk about what I’m looking for.

“I sort of figured it out myself,” Bentancur said of the recruitment process. “Luke Dalton (a former offensive lineman for Marian now in Cincinnati) helped me set up my Twitter and stuff like that. I went through all that. I’ve spoken to other players on scouting tours about how they experienced it.

Bentancur plans to visit Wisconsin on Tuesday and has other visits planned for Louisville and Arkansas, all schools that have issued offers. He will meet with the coaching staff, do campus tours, learn about programs, and do photo shoots.

Bentancur plans to make his five official visits in his freshman year, but likely in the spring semester and not during his football season.

Currently, he is training with Marian’s soccer team and attending a basketball camp. He also works with Marian graduate Pat Wenzel at the Davis Speed ​​Center in Crystal Lake.

Bentancur embraces recruiting attention, though it can get intense.

“I learned to take advantage of it,” he says. “Some parts are overwhelming and stressful at times. I enjoyed it and I’m blessed with the position I’m in right now.

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AES Ohio wants to be able to shut down service remotely https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/14/aes-ohio-wants-to-be-able-to-shut-down-service-remotely/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:27:37 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/14/aes-ohio-wants-to-be-able-to-shut-down-service-remotely/ “Remote disconnect technology may work for DP&L’s efficiency and profits, but it’s not working for the lives of Ohio families who are being denied a last chance to prevent disconnection and despair,” the OCC said in a filing with PUCO. the week. (AES Ohio is regularly referred to as DP&L in business before state regulators. […]]]>

“Remote disconnect technology may work for DP&L’s efficiency and profits, but it’s not working for the lives of Ohio families who are being denied a last chance to prevent disconnection and despair,” the OCC said in a filing with PUCO. the week.

(AES Ohio is regularly referred to as DP&L in business before state regulators. The company changed its name in February 2021.)

The power company’s current disconnection routine involves a non-payment notice sent to the customer that includes a disconnection date, with an additional winter notice if the situation occurs during colder months, AES Ohio said. in a file with the PUCO last December.

Remote disconnects via “smart meter” would occur between 8 a.m. and noon on weekdays, AES Ohio proposed to PUCO.

While AES Ohio proposed limiting the number of “vulnerable customers” who would be exempt from remote service disconnections, the OCC argued in its recent filing that “all at-risk consumers should be protected — including household members with chronic illnesses, the elderly, those with language barriers, others who may not fully understand the process of disconnecting.

“Ohio law mandates to protect at-risk Ohios, and PUCO should not approve any requests for waivers of in-person notification requirements without considering the impact of the waiver on at-risk populations,” said the OCC.

Under current routines, on the day of the disconnect, an AES Ohio employee is dispatched to the property to give notice to the customer or leave a door hanger if the customer is not home. The employee then disconnects the service.

The company wants state permission to change that. It proposed to PUCO to inform customers of the change in disconnection procedure by means of a billing message.

“In order to avoid confusion and an influx of calls into the call center, the company proposes to notify only active customers who have paid an invoice more than 30 days overdue in the previous two years” , said AES Ohio.

There would be additional notice and a call to the customer during the winter months, the company said.

AES Ohio offers to call customers two days before disconnecting service, one day before and on the disconnect date if the customer has not paid the required amount, the utility told PUCO. When available, AES Ohio will provide the customer with the choice of communication channel – essentially, SMS, phone call and/or email.

“The company’s new metering infrastructure will also enable remote reconnect capability, which will improve customer satisfaction,” AES Ohio said in a filing. “Furthermore, the approval of this waiver will have the effect of increasing the safety of its employees and contractors by avoiding coming into contact with any potential hazards or threats on the client’s premises.”

Smart meters will also enable remote reconnection of service, the company noted in its December 2021 filing.

PUCO staff recommended against the proposal.

“The app lacks sufficient messaging to customers regarding the change in sign-out practices,” they wrote late last month. “It will take time and messaging customers who have relied on the in-place review to avoid a disconnect to change their behaviors and respond to alternative reviews.”

According to the OCC, each utility has its own end-of-service procedures. In general, however, electric customers should have at least 14 days to pay each month’s bill, the office said. If payment isn’t received by the time the next bill is generated, the company can begin the disconnect process, the consumer office said.

A spokeswoman for AES Ohio said remote shutdown and restore will allow the company to waive a $25 reconnect fee.

In the summer, late AES customers receive a notice. Customers will receive a notice of disconnection by mail 14 days after the payment of the previous invoice is due. This notice tells customers the minimum they must pay to avoid service disruption and the date the bill must be paid before the service ends.

In winter, customers receive two notices.

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William Robert “Bob” Orr, East Palestine, Ohio Obituary https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/12/william-robert-bob-orr-east-palestine-ohio-obituary/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 21:10:33 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/12/william-robert-bob-orr-east-palestine-ohio-obituary/ EAST PALESTINE, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – On Friday, June 10, 2022, at age 86, William Robert “Bob” Orr joined his beloved wife, Mary Kathryn Orr, who predeceased him on January 6, 2020 in a heavenly rest. Bob proudly served his country rising to the rank of Sergeant in the US Marine Corps from October 10, 1955 […]]]>

EAST PALESTINE, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – On Friday, June 10, 2022, at age 86, William Robert “Bob” Orr joined his beloved wife, Mary Kathryn Orr, who predeceased him on January 6, 2020 in a heavenly rest.

Bob proudly served his country rising to the rank of Sergeant in the US Marine Corps from October 10, 1955 to October 9, 1961.

Bob could repair a military tank, rebuild an engine, design, build, wire and plumb a house, make furniture and replicate wooden items, repair a television, restore a Whizzer and be a loving husband and grandfather and a father of six children. He liked to go for walks and visit his family and friends. Bob loved to eat ice cream and chocolate. He was known as “the candy man”, as he frequently handed out chocolate to staff and other residents.

Bob resided in Whispering Pines Village in Columbiana, Ohio and is grateful for the loving care he received there.

Bob survived Covid and Covid pneumonia and had an ongoing struggle with Parkinson’s disease. He died at Covington Skilled Nursing in eastern Palestine in the care of staff and Hospice of the Valley after suffering a bad stroke.

Bob was buried with full military honors at Firestone Cemetery in Columbiana. Seederly-Mong & Beck Funeral Home arranged the memorial service and coordinated the honor guard and interment. OT Beight and Sons provided the headstone. Flowers for the family arranged by Sitler’s Florist.

Bob leaves behind his six children, Elizabeth Orr Aranda (Daniel), Robert Orr, John Orr, Bryan Hardesty (Riley), Jill Hardesty Montemagno (Tom) and Mark Hardesty (Melissa) and his grandchildren, Daniel and David Aranda, Mitchell and Katie Hardesty, Michael Hardesty, Kaitlyn Montemagno, Arwyn Orr and Ashley Orr Catello and family and friends in and around his beloved hometown of Columbiana, Ohio and Sevierville, Tennessee.

Psalm 139:23-24 (NIV):

“…. Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if there is an offensive way in me and lead me in the eternal way.

Psalm 91:14-16 (NIV)

“Because he loves me,” says the Lord, “I will deliver him; I will protect him, because he recognizes my name. He will invoke me and I will answer him; I will be with him in trouble, I will deliver him and honor him, with long life I will satisfy him and show him my salvation.

To send flowers to the family or plant a tree in memory of William Robert ‘Bob’ Orr, please visit our Floral Shop.

A television tribute will air Monday, June 13 at the following approximate times: 7:10 a.m. on FOX, 12:22 p.m. on WKBN, 5:08 p.m. on MyYTV, and 7:27 p.m. on WYTV.

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Ohio Valley Community Federal Credit Union opens in Wheeling | News, Sports, Jobs https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/11/ohio-valley-community-federal-credit-union-opens-in-wheeling-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 04:32:33 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/11/ohio-valley-community-federal-credit-union-opens-in-wheeling-news-sports-jobs/ picture by: Alan Olson Ohio Valley Community Federal Credit Union and Wheeling City officials gather to celebrate the official opening of the credit union Friday on Chapline Street. WHEELING – A new credit union has settled in downtown Wheeling, and its CEO says he hopes it can provide opportunities for […]]]>

picture by: Alan Olson

Ohio Valley Community Federal Credit Union and Wheeling City officials gather to celebrate the official opening of the credit union Friday on Chapline Street.

WHEELING – A new credit union has settled in downtown Wheeling, and its CEO says he hopes it can provide opportunities for the community.

The Ohio Valley Community Federal Credit Union celebrated the grand opening of its Wheeling branch on Friday. CEO Greg Harper said the new location had been in the works since 2019 and he wanted to be able to offer services to the community that other banks couldn’t.

“We would like to focus on what we call the ordinary person, more than the business side,” he said. “When it comes to businesses, we focus on small businesses rather than large ones.

“As a credit union, we have a low-income designation and we are a Community Development Financial Institution, so we can focus on bringing product to underserved areas of Wheeling and Ohio County. “, he added. “We have a program in development to help small start-ups stand out, where sometimes it’s hard for people to get financing when they’re still small.”

One particular project Harper talked about was to help fund automobiles for people who may not have public transit options.

“One of the things we’re working on is making automobiles accessible,” he said. “One of the problems in the valley is that people have to drive to work – they can’t use public transport and sometimes they can’t afford these products. We give car loans at lower prices, for longer terms, and a lot of people have less cash.

At his Chapline Street location, Harper hopes the building’s unique design will help draw attention to him.

The two-story office includes a two-way drive-thru and a 24-hour ATM.



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Building a Bridge Between Plaintiffs of Ohio Farmland Owners / Public News Service https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/08/building-a-bridge-between-plaintiffs-of-ohio-farmland-owners-public-news-service/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 23:02:39 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/08/building-a-bridge-between-plaintiffs-of-ohio-farmland-owners-public-news-service/ An ongoing program is expected to help secure the livelihoods of Ohio farmers and build resilience in the food system. The Family Farm ReGeneration Act is a new law designed to incentivize established farmers and growers to sell land, livestock, buildings and equipment to those just starting out. Amalie Lipstreu, policy director at the Ohio […]]]>

An ongoing program is expected to help secure the livelihoods of Ohio farmers and build resilience in the food system.

The Family Farm ReGeneration Act is a new law designed to incentivize established farmers and growers to sell land, livestock, buildings and equipment to those just starting out.

Amalie Lipstreu, policy director at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, said access to land is the biggest challenge for beginning farmers. With the average age of Ohio farmers being about 55, she said the next generation needs to be well equipped to grow food.

“It is in all of our interests to ensure that beginning farmers can access land,” she said, “and also have the credit, business planning assistance and resources they need. need not just to get started, but to be successful in the long run.”

The Ohio Department of Agriculture is developing the program, to provide income tax credits to established farmers who sell farm assets to beginning farmers. Beginning farmers must complete a qualified financial management program, much like OEFFA’s Heartland Farm Beginnings business course.

Ohio has the fifth-highest number of beginning farmers among the states — about 33,000. Lipstreu said the Family Farm ReGeneration Act is a way to invest in them, which will help strengthen local food systems during the difficult times.

“The COVID pandemic, the war in Ukraine and the rising cost of fertilizers really drive home the vulnerability of our food system,” she said.

Lipstreu added that millions of acres of farmland will likely change hands as older farmers and ranchers retire, and these types of investments will help ensure those acres stay in production.

Disclosure: Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association contributes to our fund for consumer issues reporting, hunger/food/nutrition, rural/agriculture, sustainable agriculture. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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Ohio Valley Leadership Class Looks Ahead | News, Sports, Jobs https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/07/ohio-valley-leadership-class-looks-ahead-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 05:16:39 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/07/ohio-valley-leadership-class-looks-ahead-news-sports-jobs/ LEADERSHIP GRADUATES – Members of Leadership Ohio Valley’s Class of 2022 gathered at Williams Golf and Country Club on Sunday for a graduation luncheon, marking the end of their program year. Graduates include, left to right, Rachael Ferrise, Jacob Keeney, Sarah Cale, Tiffany Gale, Tiffany Frohnapfel, Nick Travis, Lorie Terry, Melissa Veltri, […]]]>

LEADERSHIP GRADUATES – Members of Leadership Ohio Valley’s Class of 2022 gathered at Williams Golf and Country Club on Sunday for a graduation luncheon, marking the end of their program year. Graduates include, left to right, Rachael Ferrise, Jacob Keeney, Sarah Cale, Tiffany Gale, Tiffany Frohnapfel, Nick Travis, Lorie Terry, Melissa Veltri, Sammi Giannamore, Chris Krishak, Thomas Grossi, Amy Granato and Melinda Howell. –Craig Howell

WEIRTON — A new group of potential leaders are emerging to make their mark on the future of their community.

Over the past seven months, the 14 members of Leadership Ohio Valley have discovered the community, themselves, and the opportunities for them to give for the benefit of others. Sunday afternoon, with lunch at the Williams Golf and Country Club, their initial trip came to an end.

“This is the last official meeting of the Ohio Valley Leadership group,” said Brenda Mull, president of the Weirton Area Chamber of Commerce, which organizes the program each year. “It ends today.”

Hosting the class for their graduation, Mull encouraged them to take time to reflect on their experiences, reflect on their views on leadership and how they may have changed over the past few months, what learned about themselves and the relationships they formed. .

Mull praised the group’s determination and creativity as they worked through the various sessions of the program and organized a community project to build a blessing box for the Salvation Army in Weirton, noting that there were many options discussed for the project, some on a large scale, but their ultimate choice will provide the opportunity to help community residents for years to come.

“The smallest things can end up becoming big things” Mull said.

She encouraged graduates to believe in themselves, telling them that through this belief they can achieve anything they want.

The class also heard from John Greco, third-generation owner of Greco-Hertnick Funeral Home, who spoke about his family’s century-old business, as well as the importance of community service.

He explained his family’s traditions of hard work, finding ways to help and serve others, having a passion for your work, and the importance of education.

These traditions, he said, continue now with his family and staff, noting that he always looks at the skills of the people he hires and encourages them to take an active role in their communities and in the industry. .

“I love my community. I love my work. I am very lucky “, said Greco, who was also part of the first leadership class in 1993.

The graduating members of the Class of 2022 from Leadership Ohio Valley are Sarah Cale, Top of West Virginia Convention and Visitors Bureau; Rachael Ferrise, Community College of Northern West Virginia; Tiffany Frohnapfel, Eastern Gateway Community College; Tiffany Gale, Miss Tiffany’s Home for Early Childhood Education; Sammi Giannamore, SM Magnone, CPA; Amy Granato, Weirton Madonna High School; Thomas Grossi, Weirton Geriatric Center; Penny Hamilton, Giometti Restoration; Melinda Howell; Jacob Keeney, Business Development Corp. the Northern Panhandle; Chris Krishak, Town of Weirton; Lorie Terry, Crown Cork & Seal; Nick Travis, Rotary Club of Weirton Heights; and Melissa Veltri, Starvaggi Industries.

Class coordinators were Sarah Farran and Brandon Palmeri, and session counselors included Carole Scheerbaum, Will Beaumont, Debbie Watkins, Clayton Henderson, Crystal Harbert, Pam Makricosta and Marvin Six.



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250-mile journey highlights communities along the Ohio River https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/05/250-mile-journey-highlights-communities-along-the-ohio-river/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/05/250-mile-journey-highlights-communities-along-the-ohio-river/ PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — When 14 paddlers set out on their nine-day journey, waving goodbye to dozens of onlookers, they hoped they were starting something bigger than their planned 250-mile journey. With the first ribbon cutting and wayfinding sign delivered, the Ohio River Way Coalition has taken its first steps to help build its vision for […]]]>

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — When 14 paddlers set out on their nine-day journey, waving goodbye to dozens of onlookers, they hoped they were starting something bigger than their planned 250-mile journey.

With the first ribbon cutting and wayfinding sign delivered, the Ohio River Way Coalition has taken its first steps to help build its vision for an interconnected water trail along the river, highlighting each town along the along the way from Portsmouth to Louisville.


What do you want to know

  • Paddlers travel from Portsmouth to Louisville to highlight the Ohio River Way
  • They will stop in 18 communities for nine days
  • The goal is to showcase the unique amenities each riverside community offers and promote adventure tourism
  • The journey spans 250 miles and three states

For Rhoads Brewster, president of the Ohio River Way Coalition, the group’s goals are simple: to promote, protect and celebrate the river and all the communities that border it.

“The goal is to invite and encourage people, especially those with an interest in adventure tourism, to come and have an adventure on the Ohio River Way,” he said. “Explore towns, recreation opportunities, etc.”

The paddlers set out from Portsmouth on May 31. (Michelle Alfini/ Spectrum News 1)

As part of the project, Brewster said the coalition is working with 18 riverside communities to help them highlight and develop what their towns can offer to take advantage of all the recreational opportunities the Ohio River has to offer.

“It’s a way to get civic leaders out and get them excited about this project about the potential to bring more tourists to their community,” he said. “We encourage them to develop these projects, and then we will market them fully.”

The River Way Coalition began its journey with a ribbon cutting in Portsmouth. (Michelle Alfini/ Spectrum News 1)

Now that the communities are connected, Brewster said the most obvious way to show off their work is to bring a group into the river and make the trip themselves.

The journey began in Portsmouth, with a ribbon cutting for their Ohio River Way trail leg, a pattern they hope to repeat at least once a day in every town they stop in. Then the paddlers set off, Portsmouth Mayor Sean Dunne joining them on their journey to Cincinnati.

“He’s really embraced what we’re trying to do,” Brewster said.

Swanson plans to paddle the first half of the trip from Portsmouth to Cincinnati. (Michelle Alfini/ Spectrum News 1)

Bill Swanson was another paddler on the first half of the trip.

Having hiked the river from Cincinnati to Louisville before, he said he wanted to see what the other side of the trail offered.

“There are stretches of this river that, other than being 15 feet higher and the rapids gone, look very much like they did 200 years ago,” he said. -he declares.

Now retired, he said exploring nature and the river and encouraging others to try their own adventures has become a passion of his, which is why he now spends much of his time volunteering with the Cincinnati Adventure Crew.

“We take the kids outside throughout the school year and go boating, hiking, rock climbing,” Swanson said. “A lot of kids have never had this experience before.”

The group plans to arrive in Louisville on June 9. (Michelle Alfini/ Spectrum News 1)

It’s all free thanks to the nonprofit to make adventure sports and outdoor activities more accessible to everyone in Cincinnati. To keep it that way, Swanson wanted to turn his trip into a fundraiser for next year’s Adventure Crew lineup.

“We call it paddling for a purpose,” he said.

The group plans to arrive in Louisville on June 9, with a celebratory ceremony marking the trip and all the places that made the trip worthwhile.

“You really can’t get it anywhere else in America. It’s like a 275-mile national park with all these cultural amenities as well,” Brewster said.

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