US States – GPAOH http://gpaoh.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:55:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gpaoh.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png US States – GPAOH http://gpaoh.com/ 32 32 Southern NJ Wildfire Mostly Contained; No injury | New Jersey News https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/21/southern-nj-wildfire-mostly-contained-no-injury-new-jersey-news/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:45:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/21/southern-nj-wildfire-mostly-contained-no-injury-new-jersey-news/ By WAYNE PARRY, Associated Press A wildfire burning in southern New Jersey was 85% contained by noon Tuesday, and firefighters were confident it would not spread beyond the perimeter lines they had created. The blaze in Wharton State Forest is believed to have been caused by an illegal, unattended campfire in the woods, said Greg […]]]>

By WAYNE PARRY, Associated Press

A wildfire burning in southern New Jersey was 85% contained by noon Tuesday, and firefighters were confident it would not spread beyond the perimeter lines they had created.

The blaze in Wharton State Forest is believed to have been caused by an illegal, unattended campfire in the woods, said Greg McLaughlin, chief of the New Jersey Forest Fire Service.

He said the blaze burned 13,500 of the 15,175 acre containment zone that has been put in place around him.

No one was injured and none of the 18 threatened structures was actually damaged.

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The fire started at 10 a.m. Sunday and quickly spread to areas of Washington Township in Burlington County and Mullica Township in Atlantic County.

“It was basically a makeshift (camp) fire,” McLaughlin said. “We suspect that people were passing by, whether on the river or on a hike. But we ruled out natural causes.

At least 50 people had to be evacuated from remote campsites in the forest that were only accessible by river or by hiking.

The fire was burning in a remote area of ​​the forest where access is difficult due to the configuration of the roads crossing the park and the fact that many of them have holes that fill with water, which slows down the progress of oncoming fire engines.

Firefighters used 22 engines, a helicopter with a 325-gallon bucket and other equipment to battle the blaze, which was expected to continue belching smoke for several days.

Local roads near the blaze were reopened Tuesday morning.

The fire threatened nearly half of the 40 historic structures in the village of Batsto, a popular tourist attraction with hikers and canoeists.

Fire engines were stationed near these buildings as well as some private structures that were in the path of the fire to protect them.

Hiking trails in Wharton State Forest will remain closed for several days until they can be inspected for any safety risks.

Follow Wayne Parry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/WayneParryAC

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Researchers study the production of rare elements from ND coal | North Dakota News https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/19/researchers-study-the-production-of-rare-elements-from-nd-coal-north-dakota-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:55:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/19/researchers-study-the-production-of-rare-elements-from-nd-coal-north-dakota-news/ GRAND FORKS, ND (AP) – Researchers are studying whether it would be possible to recover some of the rare elements used to make magnets for electric motors and cell phones, batteries and other high-tech products from coal seams of North Dakota. It has already been proven that certain rare earth elements such as neodymium and […]]]>

GRAND FORKS, ND (AP) – Researchers are studying whether it would be possible to recover some of the rare elements used to make magnets for electric motors and cell phones, batteries and other high-tech products from coal seams of North Dakota.

It has already been proven that certain rare earth elements such as neodymium and lanthanum and other critical minerals can be found in the state’s coal, but it is not clear if there are enough of these. elements to make their production economical.

So the Bismarck Tribune reports that a group from the University of North Dakota’s Center for Energy and Environmental Research will spend the next year investigating this possibility as part of a 2.45 millions of dollars. The effort received federal and state grants and financial support from several coal mining companies and coal-fired power plant operators.

“Many of these materials are more abundant on earth than gold,” said one of the researchers John Kay. “What makes them rare is that wherever you find them, they are not very concentrated. It is difficult to extract them in any quantity.

One of the hardest things to predict is the future price of these items, as they are so little produced that prices can be volatile. Moreover, it is difficult to predict if a new use could be developed for any of the elements that could lead to an increase in demand.

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Currently, most of the world’s supply of rare earth elements comes from China.

Being able to produce rare earth elements as well would help coal mining companies who face competition from natural gas and concerns about how burning the fuel produces greenhouse gases and contributes to climate change.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Abortions in the United States have increased for the first time in 30 years, according to Guttmacher https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/15/abortions-in-the-united-states-have-increased-for-the-first-time-in-30-years-according-to-guttmacher/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:27:57 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/15/abortions-in-the-united-states-have-increased-for-the-first-time-in-30-years-according-to-guttmacher/ After a 30-year decline, abortions in the United States increased by nearly 8% from 2017 to 2020, according to new data from abortion rights group Guttmacher Institute. In 2020, there were 930,160 abortions in the United States, compared to 862,320 abortions in 2017, according to the survey released Wednesday. Abortion rate declining steadily since peak […]]]>
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Ingalls Shipbuilding christens its latest amphibious vessel | Mississippi News https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/11/ingalls-shipbuilding-christens-its-latest-amphibious-vessel-mississippi-news/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 22:26:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/11/ingalls-shipbuilding-christens-its-latest-amphibious-vessel-mississippi-news/ PASCAGOULA, Miss. (AP) – Ingalls Shipbuilding christened its 13th amphibious ship on Saturday, naming it after Richard M. McCool Jr., a U.S. Navy captain who received the Medal of Honor for rescuing survivors from a destroyer sinking during a world war II kamikaze attack. “Today, we reflect on the bravery and heroism of Richard M. […]]]>

PASCAGOULA, Miss. (AP) – Ingalls Shipbuilding christened its 13th amphibious ship on Saturday, naming it after Richard M. McCool Jr., a U.S. Navy captain who received the Medal of Honor for rescuing survivors from a destroyer sinking during a world war II kamikaze attack.

“Today, we reflect on the bravery and heroism of Richard M. McCool Jr. as he embarks on a ship that will carry another generation of brave Sailors and Marines on missions in defense of our freedom,” the President said. ‘Ingalls Shipbuilding, Kari Wilkinson, in a press release.

His rescue efforts took place exactly 77 years to the day the day LPD 29 was named in his honor, the company said.

Under Secretary of the Navy Erik Raven, guest speaker at the christening, said McCool embodied “the spirit of service above self.”

“The Sailors and Marines who will sail on this future ship continue this legacy by following the example of spirit, patriotism and selflessness set by Richard M. McCool Jr.,” Raven said.

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The Richard M. McCool Jr. is co-sponsored by Shana McCool and Kate Oja, granddaughters of the ship’s namesake. Together they officially christened the ship by smashing a bottle of sparkling wine on the bow.

“To the Commander and future crew of this ship, may he (the ship) protect you. And in the words of our grandfather, always remember to fight as a unit and not as individuals,” said Shana McCool.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with the President of the United States of America, Joe Biden https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/10/prime-minister-justin-trudeau-meets-with-the-president-of-the-united-states-of-america-joe-biden/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 04:48:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/10/prime-minister-justin-trudeau-meets-with-the-president-of-the-united-states-of-america-joe-biden/ CANADA, September 6 – Today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with the President of the United States of America, Joe Biden, to reiterate their commitment to deepening the Canada-U.S. partnership on a wide range of bilateral, regional and global. The leaders discussed Putin’s illegal and unjustifiable military aggression against Ukraine, the immense grief and human […]]]>

CANADA, September 6 – Today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with the President of the United States of America, Joe Biden, to reiterate their commitment to deepening the Canada-U.S. partnership on a wide range of bilateral, regional and global.

The leaders discussed Putin’s illegal and unjustifiable military aggression against Ukraine, the immense grief and human suffering, and underlined their unwavering commitment to continue supporting the government and people of Ukraine. The leaders agreed to continue their close cooperation on sanctions alignment, and on economic, humanitarian, military and other assistance, and to continue to work with partners and allies to maintain unity in the face of defiance of the Russia for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine and the rules-based international order.

The Prime Minister underscored Canada’s commitment to the defense and security of NATO allies and the North American continent. He outlined Canada’s recent defense spending commitments in Budget 2022 and discussed support for the modernization of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD).

At the Summit of the Americas, the Prime Minister and the President shared their mutual commitment to the Summit theme “Building a Sustainable, Resilient and Equitable Future”. The Prime Minister underscored his commitment to supporting inclusive economic growth, pandemic recovery, climate action, green transition and democratic resilience in the hemisphere. The Prime Minister expressed support for President Biden’s Partnership of the Americas for Economic Prosperity and looked forward to working with the President and other partners in the hemisphere to advance the well-being of people across the country. hemisphere.

The Prime Minister and the President discussed irregular migration and forced displacement, and reiterated their commitment to working together to address the root causes of migration. The Prime Minister expressed his support for the Los Angeles Declaration on Migration and Protection, and his commitment to strengthen cooperation with the United States and other partners to respond to current challenges in humanitarian assistance, protection and irregular migration in the region.

The Prime Minister and the President discussed the current crisis in Haiti.

Leaders noted the polarizing effects of disinformation and the serious threat it poses to civil societies, particularly in Russia.

The Prime Minister and the President discussed their mutual commitment to strengthen collaboration on regional security and good governance in the Indo-Pacific region, and with regard to their respective relations with China. They acknowledged Canada’s recent announcement that it intends to implement a new telecommunications security framework and ban the inclusion of Huawei and ZTE products and services in Canada’s 5G networks.

The Prime Minister and President renewed their commitment to supply chain security and resilience and noted the release earlier today of the Supply Chains Task Force’s progress report. -United-Canada/Canada-United States.

Leaders also noted the progress made under the Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals, and discussed the importance of taking further action bilaterally. They also underlined their commitment to working with like-minded partners to drive investment in mineral mining, processing and recycling projects, including for critical minerals that are essential inputs for electric vehicles. , advanced batteries and other clean energy technologies.

Leaders noted recent challenges in global energy markets and reiterated the importance of working together to strengthen Canada’s and the United States’ energy security. They recognized the opportunity that increased Canada-U.S. energy collaboration presents for our collective energy security, that national energy security and climate action are increasingly inextricably linked, and that clean energy transition will ensure energy security. and a sustainable future for generations to come. .

The Prime Minister and the President thus took note of their joint commitment to combating climate change and accelerating the green transition.

The Prime Minister and the President stressed the importance of continuing to promote and nurture trade and investment ties. The Prime Minister noted that the imposition of duties on Canadian softwood lumber puts additional pressure on prices and affordability of homes.

The Prime Minister and President underscored the uniqueness of the Canada-US partnership and the broad and deep people-to-people ties that bind us together, and underscored their mutual commitment to continue to deepen the relationship for the benefit of all of our citizens.

The leaders agreed that the president will visit Canada in the coming months.

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Trump ally seeks return to Congress as seven US states hold midterm primaries https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/07/trump-ally-seeks-return-to-congress-as-seven-us-states-hold-midterm-primaries/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 23:05:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/07/trump-ally-seeks-return-to-congress-as-seven-us-states-hold-midterm-primaries/ US President Donald Trump walks past Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke as he stands to address the 17th annual 9/11 observance at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, US, on September 11 September 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register WASHINGTON, June 7 (Reuters) – A former member of […]]]>

US President Donald Trump walks past Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke as he stands to address the 17th annual 9/11 observance at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, US, on September 11 September 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

WASHINGTON, June 7 (Reuters) – A former member of Donald Trump’s cabinet was trying to return to the U.S. Congress in Montana and California Democrats concerned about crime could oust one of their own when voters head to the polls in the election midterm primaries in seven states. tuesday.

Voters in South Dakota, New Jersey, Iowa, Mississippi and New Mexico also voted in nominating contests that will define the competitive field for the Nov. 8 election, which will determine Congressional control over the next two years.

With President Joe Biden plummeting in the polls and soaring inflation souring voters’ moods, Republicans are expected to take control of the House of Representatives and possibly the Senate, which would put a end to Biden’s legislative agenda and would empower Republicans to launch distracting activity and potentially politically damaging investigations.

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Just 41% of Americans approve of Biden’s performance as president, near the lowest level of his presidency, according to a Reuters/Ipsos public opinion poll conducted on Tuesday.

The poll also showed the Democratic Party and the Republican Party neck and neck in voter preferences ahead of November’s congressional elections. Thirty-nine percent said they would vote for a Democrat versus 37% for a Republican. The difference was well within the poll’s 4 percentage point credibility interval

More Americans also expressed confidence in Republicans’ ability to deal with inflation, which has surged this year. Democrats had the edge in voter preferences for responding to gun violence and for women’s rights, issues that have become more prominent following a series of mass shootings and expectations that the Supreme Court United States may soon override women’s constitutional right to abortion.

In Montana, Ryan Zinke, who served as Interior Secretary under former Republican President Trump, is running for a newly created House seat the state won through population growth and the redistricting process a times per decade.

Zinke, who once served in Congress, faces four Republican challengers, some of whom claim he is too liberal or lacks commitment to the state because his wife’s residence is in California.

Zinke was accused in an inspector general’s report this year of using his position as Home Office chief to advance a development project in his hometown and of lying to an investigator about ethics. He denied wrongdoing.

South Dakota’s conservative Republican Governor Kristi Noem faces a challenge from South Dakota House of Representatives member Steven Haugaard.

Noem has been mentioned as a possible running mate if former President Donald Trump seeks re-election in 2024 or as a full-fledged candidate for the White House if he does not.

The winners of each of these Republican primaries are favored to win in November.

SHAKEOUT IN CALIFORNIA

A pair of races in California will also illustrate the frustrations of liberal-leaning voters with spikes in homicides and gun violence. Read more

Polls show progressive San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin is likely to be ousted from office in a recall vote. A replacement would be chosen by the city’s mayor, London Breed, a Democrat who has criticized Boudin but has not taken a position on the recall.

In Los Angeles, Rick Caruso, a billionaire developer and former Republican, takes on U.S. Representative Karen Bass and a host of other liberal mayoral candidates.

Caruso, who has spent more than $30 million of his own campaign money, has made crime the centerpiece of his candidacy in a city that has seen homicides hit a 15-year high in 2021. That forced Bass , a longtime progressive champion in Congress, move to the center and commit to putting more police on the streets. Caruso and Bass could be heading to a second round, according to the polls.

NEW JERSEY AND IOWA CHALLENGES

Republicans are also choosing challengers for two beleaguered incumbent House Democrats: Representatives Tom Malinowski in New Jersey and Cindy Axne in Iowa.

Former Republican leader of the state Senate, Tom Kean Jr., the son of popular two-time Gov. Thomas Kean, leads a crowded Republican field to challenge Malinowski.

Malinowski, a two-term holder who entered Congress by flipping a Republican seat in 2018, won re-election beating Kean by 1.2 percentage points in 2020. Since then, his prospects have been weakened by redistricting and a House ethics investigation after reports he failed to disclose hundreds of thousands of dollars in stock trades.

“He was a nail biter in 2020 and his district has become a bit more Republican-friendly, so it’s going to be a tall order,” said Benjamin Dworkin, director of the Institute for Public Policy and Citizenship at the University. Rowan University.

In Iowa, three Republicans are vying for the chance to challenge Axne: businesswoman Nicole Hasso, construction consultant Gary Leffler, and former state senator Zach Nunn.

Nunn, the only Republican candidate to hold elected office, enjoys a slew of endorsements from party luminaries, including former Trump secretary of state Mike Pompeo and several sitting Republicans.

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Reporting by David Morgan; Editing by Scott Malone and Alistair Bell

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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doctor named in abortion case has nothing to do with trial | Mississippi News https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/06/doctor-named-in-abortion-case-has-nothing-to-do-with-trial-mississippi-news/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 05:18:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/06/doctor-named-in-abortion-case-has-nothing-to-do-with-trial-mississippi-news/ By EMILY WAGSTER PETTUS and MIKE STOBBE, Associated Press JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Dr. Thomas Dobbs has never involved himself in political struggles over reproductive health, but his name has become shorthand for a court case that could end abortion rights in the United States. If he has feelings about the situation, he pretty much […]]]>

By EMILY WAGSTER PETTUS and MIKE STOBBE, Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Dr. Thomas Dobbs has never involved himself in political struggles over reproductive health, but his name has become shorthand for a court case that could end abortion rights in the United States. If he has feelings about the situation, he pretty much keeps them to himself.

Mississippi’s top public health official named in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, a dispute over a state law that would ban most abortions after the 15th week, but could be used to overturn Roe v. Wade.

A leaked draft opinion from the US Supreme Court shows a conservative majority of justices are ready to use the case to overturn the landmark 1973 court ruling that established the right to abortion in all the countries.

Dobbs, 52, is the physician in charge of the state Department of Health, which regulates Mississippi’s only abortion clinic. As the state’s chief health officer, he is the person who must be named in any lawsuit related to abortion or other health issues, he explained in a recent Twitter post.

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So while the name at the center of the abortion debate could possibly change from “Roe” to “Dobbs,” it’s not the health worker but the state attorney general’s office that is handling the case. of State.

“I had no direct involvement in any element of this legal action,” he wrote in the post.

Liz Sharlot, director of communications for the state health department, confirmed Dobbs’ strictly nominal role and declined a request from the Associated Press to interview him because, she said, he “n did not personally initiate this case”.

“The only role of the Mississippi State Health Department regarding abortion facilities is regulation to support the law, inspection and licensing of that facility,” Sharlot wrote in an email.

Dobbs is a former state epidemiologist who became health department chief in 2018, months after Mississippi’s Republican-controlled legislature passed the abortion restriction law that is now at the center of the debate. ‘judicial affair.

He has spent his public health career focusing not on abortion, but on finding better outcomes in a state plagued by high infant mortality rates and other poor health statistics.

The legal fight against abortion began when Mississippi’s only abortion clinic sued the 15-week ban. The lawsuit was originally called Jackson Women’s Health Organization v. Currier et al. The main defendant was then-public health officer Dr. Mary Currier. After he left, a judge removed Currier’s name from the case and replaced it with Dobbs.

A federal district judge blocked the law from going into effect. When the state appealed to the Supreme Court, the name of the case was reversed, Dobbs v. Clinic.

During an online briefing hosted by the Mississippi State Medical Association in June 2021, Dobbs was asked about his name on the abortion case. He was quick to note that Dr. Kenneth Cleveland was also named in the lawsuit in his capacity as head of the Mississippi State Board of Medical Licensure.

“He didn’t make the headlines,” said then-medical association president Dr. Mark Horne in a good-natured jab at Dobbs.

“I’m trying to get him to trade with me,” Dobbs joked.

Until now, the name most associated with the abortion debate was Jane Roe, the pseudonym of a Dallas woman named Norma McCorvey, who was the plaintiff in the famous Roe v. Wade case. Wade was Henry Wade, the Dallas County District Attorney at the time.

In 1969, 22-year-old McCorvey became pregnant for the third time and wanted an abortion. McCorvey and her lawyers eventually won the legal battle, but not before she gave birth and gave the girl up for adoption. She later became an anti-abortion activist. McCorvey was 69 when she died in 2017.

Another name that comes up often in the debate is that of Robert P. Casey, a former Democratic governor of Pennsylvania who was an anti-abortion advocate. In 1989, he worked with the state legislature to enact a law that imposed several limitations on abortion. Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania challenged the law. In 1992, the Supreme Court upheld most of the restrictions, but also affirmed a woman’s right to abortion. Casey died in 2000. The name of the case was Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

Although Dobbs hasn’t been involved in abortion debates, he’s spent the past two years embroiled in another controversial health issue: the COVID-19 pandemic. At dozens of press conferences and other public appearances, he implored people to get vaccinated, wear masks and maintain social distancing. He persisted even as many people, including some officials, resisted.

In August, Dobbs said he received threats from people who believed false conspiracy theories about him and his family while promoting COVID-19 vaccinations. Dobbs said one lie is that her son, who is also a doctor, receives a World Bank-funded bribe when Dobbs urges people to get vaccinated.

“I don’t get any vaccine promotion dollars,” Dobbs wrote on Twitter.

Before COVID-19 vaccines became available, the usually even-tempered Dobbs expressed frustration with people’s insistence on attending social events and after-school school activities, including sports competitions.

“Our prioritization hierarchy is extremely stupid,” Dobbs said in November 2020. “‘We prioritize youth sports, not just academics. We actually prioritize community health, just to be honest. »

While in the midst of battling the stressful pandemic, Dobbs said he turned to exercise and listening to music — jazz and the Rolling Stones — as ways to disconnect from the work. He announced in March that he would retire at the end of July.

Dr. Georges Benjamin is executive director of the American Public Health Association, one of several public health and research groups that have filed a legal case criticizing Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban.

Benjamin said he was unaware of Dobbs’ personal opinion on abortion and the legal issues surrounding the case, and expressed doubts that Dobbs would state them publicly.

“Your name may be associated with a court case when you do these jobs,” Benjamin said. “But your associated name may not match your own views. You are the public official, and that is unfortunately what happens when you accept these jobs.

Benjamin said Dobbs has done “incredible” work as a Mississippi health worker during the pandemic, including stellar work on inequality issues. He called him a “trustworthy figure who follows scientific principles”.

Benjamin’s hope, he said, is that Dobbs’ reputation “won’t be tarnished” by having his name on the abortion case.

AP Medical Writer Mike Stobbe reported from New York.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Officials: Tempe plagued by deteriorating sewer lines | Arizona News https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/04/officials-tempe-plagued-by-deteriorating-sewer-lines-arizona-news/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 15:09:42 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/04/officials-tempe-plagued-by-deteriorating-sewer-lines-arizona-news/ By HUNTER BASSLER, 12 News TEMPE, Ariz. (AP) – TEMPE, Ariz. – A recent waterline rupture that spilled an estimated 8 million gallons of water and closed a major Phoenix-area highway has put Tempe’s water infrastructure back in the news. Checking water mains has become a priority for Tempe officials since the incident, but Tempe […]]]>

By HUNTER BASSLER, 12 News

TEMPE, Ariz. (AP) – TEMPE, Ariz. – A recent waterline rupture that spilled an estimated 8 million gallons of water and closed a major Phoenix-area highway has put Tempe’s water infrastructure back in the news.

Checking water mains has become a priority for Tempe officials since the incident, but Tempe residents should turn their attention to another type of water infrastructure: sewer lines.

According to a map provided by the city, thousands of Tempe homes may have severely deteriorated sewer lines underneath. An expert said the problem could affect up to “nine out of 10 homes” in the area.

The pipes could cause massive sewage backups, repair bills and headaches for homeowners if they aren’t enrolled in a program to minimize the pain on residents’ wallets and fix mistakes in the past, reported 12 News.

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The pipes, called “Orangeburg Pipe”, are made of paper with an inner layer of tar. They were used to connect homes to the city’s public sewer between 1940 and 1970.

The average lifespan of Orangeburg pipes is around 50 years, but they have been known to fail in as little as 10 years. The vast majority of the pipes are expected to be badly deteriorated today, even by the softest of estimates.

“You have two different things that can happen,” said Samuel Ariaratnam, professor and director of the construction engineering program at ASU’s School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment.

“You could have a crack, where you have sewage leaking onto your property, or you could have a collapsed pipe, where you would see (sewer) backups.”

Tempe has no idea where the piping is because former city officials did not keep records of where the pipes were installed, the city’s website said.

Plumbing professionals have seen how widespread the pipe problem is.

“The city of Tempe is plagued by Orangeburg…it’s almost like the whole city was built with it,” said Mason Cruz, master drain cleaner and sewer line repair specialist at Roto- Root.

“Nine out of 10 homes we go to in the city of Tempe have an Orangeburg pipe underneath…I can’t count how many times we’ve had blown sections or oval pipes of this Orangeburg.”

Cruz said that while Tempe’s program helps owners change the Orangeburg hose, he’s seen the hose all over the valley.

“Phoenix, Sun City – You’ll find it in older neighborhoods in Chandler, Gilbert, things like that,” Cruz said.

12 News contacted various municipalities in the valley to see if officials knew if the Orangeburg pipe was in their town.

Glendale building official Djordje Pavlovic said the pipe was used in the city until 1982 and is not allowed to be used in construction now.

Municipalities like Scottsdale and Goodyear said there was very limited use in their cities.

Avondale officials told 12 News that crews encountered him while replacing sewer service in the oldest historic part of their town. Adding that it appears to have been used similarly to Tempe, to connect a house to the main sewer line.

Phoenix crews also encountered some sections of Orangeburg pipes in areas the city deals with and also replaced them when they encountered them.

City of Mesa and City of Peoria spokespersons said they did not appear to have the pipe in their lines.

Typically, residents have to pay for repairs to their drains themselves, whether the repairs are based on a systemic lack of long-term infrastructure planning or not.

Ariaratnam says that’s the wrong approach when it comes to Orangeburg.

“The best approach would be for the neighborhood or city to help coordinate this with a replacement program,” Ariaratnam said. “That’s the best approach if you want to get rid of as much Orangeburg as you can.”

The good news is that Tempe officials are doing just that.

A recently created “SLWA” program, run in partnership with Tempe and Service Line Warranties of America, covers residential repairs up to $8,500 for service line repairs, including the Orangeburg hose.

The program is open to Tempe homeowners and costs $9.88 per month for the first year and $10.98 per month after the first year, according to the city’s webpage.

“SLWA plan holders have access to a 24-hour, 365-day-a-year repair hotline, and repairs are performed by local, licensed, and insured contractors SLWA has identified in the area,” the webpage reads. .

“Tempeans can learn more about these optional plans by visiting RepairsTempe.com or calling toll-free 1-844-257-8795.”

The SLWA program began on February 1, 2022 and was an update to Tempe’s previous program called “SLiPP”.

Cruz, who has been hired several times in the city, said residents shouldn’t be afraid to take advantage of the program because it’s a huge step in the right direction to address the drain problem.

“It’s a really good program for Tempe owners, for sure,” Cruz said. “Some people take advantage of it, some people think it’s not real, but…they’re trying to fix the mistakes they made many years ago.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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The goal is to reduce the dead zone of the Gulf, but it is not happening | Louisiana News https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/02/the-goal-is-to-reduce-the-dead-zone-of-the-gulf-but-it-is-not-happening-louisiana-news/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 23:04:00 +0000 https://gpaoh.com/2022/06/02/the-goal-is-to-reduce-the-dead-zone-of-the-gulf-but-it-is-not-happening-louisiana-news/ NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Decades of work has not reduced the oxygen-depleted “dead zone” that forms each year in the Gulf of Mexico off Louisiana and Texas. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts this year will be around the 35-year average. This is almost triple the target of reducing the area with too little […]]]>

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Decades of work has not reduced the oxygen-depleted “dead zone” that forms each year in the Gulf of Mexico off Louisiana and Texas.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts this year will be around the 35-year average. This is almost triple the target of reducing the area with too little oxygen for the survival of marine animals.

The combination of models developed by five universities resulted in a forecast of about 5,364 square miles (13,893 square kilometers), NOAA said in a press release. That’s a hair shy of the measured five-year average of 5,380 square miles (13,934 square kilometers) and about 15% less than last year’s measurement.

In 2001, a federal state task force set a long-term goal of reducing the dead zone, or hypoxic zone, to 1,900 square miles (4,920 square kilometers), or about 35 percent of the average current.

“The action plan to reduce the size of the Gulf of Mexico dead zone was established more than 20 years ago, but this year’s forecast is comparable to the 35-year average zone,” Don said. Scavia from the University of Michigan, who leads one of several research teams working with NOAA.

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“Clearly, federal and state agencies and Congress continue to prioritize industrial agriculture over water quality,” Scavia, professor emeritus at the School for Environment and Sustainability, said in a statement. press release on the university’s website.

The Gulf dead zone is largely created by urban and agricultural runoff and discharges of nitrogen and phosphorus into the Mississippi River, which drains 41% of the continental United States. In the Gulf of Mexico, nutrients fuel a bloom of algae, which die and sink to the bottom, using oxygen from the ocean floor as they decompose.

Fish, shrimp and crabs can swim. Slow-moving or bottom-fixed animals cannot.

“The Gulf dead zone remains the largest hypoxic zone in U.S. waters, and we want to better understand its causes and impacts,” said Nicole LeBoeuf, deputy administrator of NOAA’s National Ocean Service. “The modeling we do here is an important part of NOAA’s goal to protect, restore, and manage coastal and ocean resource use through ecosystem-based management.”

The problem is by no means unique to the United States.

“The number of dead zones around the world has increased over the past few decades and currently stands at more than 500,” wrote Louisiana State University scientists Nancy Rabalais, who have studied the phenomenon since 1985, and Eugene Turner in a separate statement Thursday.

In 1999, researchers knew of 61 hypoxic zones around the world.

The one that stretches along most of the Louisiana coast and into Texas waters “is the second-largest human-made coastal hypoxic zone in the global ocean,” Rabalais and Turner wrote.

The models used by NOAA were developed by the agency and scientists from LSU, Michigan, William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science, North Carolina State University, Dalhousie University and the US Geological Survey, which provides data on Mississippi Nutrients.

Some universities also publish their own forecasts. LSU, which views nitrogen levels in May as the main driver of the area’s size in July, projects its size this year at 5,881 square miles (15,233 square kilometers).

The Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico Interagency Hypoxia Task Force uses NOAA’s hypoxia prediction models and USGS nutrient monitoring to set nutrient reduction goals in US states. Mississippi watershed.

Officials noted that the bipartisan infrastructure law signed in November 2021 includes $60 million over five years for the Environmental Protection Agency to support nutrient reduction strategies in the watershed.

“The Hypoxia Task Force has a transformative opportunity to further control nutrient loads in the Mississippi River Basin and reduce the size of the hypoxic zone using bipartisan Infrastructure Act funding,” said John Goodin, director of the EPA’s Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds. “This annual forecast is a key metric for assessing the progress made by the Hypoxia Task Force.”

To confirm the size of the hypoxic zone and refine forecast models, NOAA supports a monitoring survey each summer.

Because hurricanes and tropical storms boil water and mix with oxygen, one within two weeks of the cruise could significantly reduce the dead zone.

“If a storm occurs, the size of the area should be 56% of the predicted size without the storm,” or about 3,294 square miles (8,530 square kilometers), Rabalais and Turner wrote in their forecast.

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